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Cool off with Aqueduct prints at CFL from Cotton Collection

July 26, 2017
by

Croton Aqueduct at the CFL this Summer

Cool off this summer with prints from the collection of Cornelia Cotton showing the history of the Croton Aqueduct.   These prints are at the Croton Free Library, 171 Cleveland Drive, Croton-on-Hudson, NY.  Hours and Directions.

Cornelia, among the founding members of CCoA and very active in it, is multi talented — a collector, photographer, historian, writer, and a wonderful speaker.  Here the collected prints speak for her fascination in the extraordinary and elegant engineering feat that is the Aqueduct that has been so important to the development of New York City.  (The print here is the first Croton Dam, from which water was fed into the Aqueduct.  It was replaced in 1906 by the New Croton Dam, a major and impressive stone structure.)

A vitrine in the library contains some photographs of and in the Aqueduct by mary Jean Picciano (see link for portfolio) and Bonnie Coe (see link for bird photography).


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Also: We are passing along a Note from ArtsWestchester

to Westchester-based artists and arts organizations:

Learn about the funding opportunities available to Westchester-based artists and cultural organizations through ArtsWestchester’s Arts Alive Grants.
Pre-application workshops are running now through September 12.

Sign up today!

  • Project Grants support community-based arts and cultural projects.
  • Artist Grants support the creation of new work related to the community.
  • Arts Education Grants support in-school, after-school, and lifelong learning activities developed by artists or cultural organizations in collaboration with educators.
Arts Alive Grant applications are due October 4, 2017
For More Information Visit:

artsw.org/artsalive

Arts Alive applications will be available online by July 31, 2017.

Updates from Postcard Tuesdays + Important Health Care Action Info!

July 10, 2017
by
Postcard Tuesdays
Summer hours aren’t slowing us down!
We’ve sent more than 18,000 cards
to local and national leaders since January.

We will continue working for liberty and justice for all!
RUSSIA, HEALTHCARE, and more still on the table.
Please join us!

SUMMER HOURS
July 18 & 25

Black Cow Coffee Co. 
11am-4pm
The Green Growler
5-7pm

August-Labor Day
we will break like Congress

We are growing every week, we are grateful to this community.
This is working because of you!

A BIG THANKS TO MARIO, SUSAN and GLENN
for running #PostcardsTuesdays at the Green Growler!
IMPORTANT NOW
NATIONAL Indivisible
DAY OF ACTION AGAINST TRUMPCARE 

TUESDAY JULY 18 at 11am at
SENATOR SCHUMER’S PEEKSKILL OFFICE

On Tuesday July 18, our whole national network will be showing up together to say that TrumpCare would hurt our friends, our families and our country—and we’re not letting that happen without a fight. This action will mirror similar events happening in DC at the key Senators’ Capitol Hill offices.

What: National Indivisible Action against Trumpcare
Where: Senator Schumer’s Office, 1 Park Place, Peekskill, NY 10566
When: Tuesday, July 18th at 11 am

Bring: Signs, copies of your personal story

Come and write some postcards after you protest.
Double your message power!
Please continue to call the following Senators!  
Urge them to come up with a better Healthcare plan
NO for current plan.
We want Affordable Health Care for all.
LOG IN TO LINK AND HELP PRESERVE THESE MARINE SANCTUARIES.
The Us Park Service needs our help.
https://www.regulations.gov/docket?D=NOAA-NOS-2017-0066
Postcard Tuesdays is a vehicle for citizens to express their concerns to elected representatives and exercise their cherished First Amendment rights.  We want to build bridges instead of walls, and we trust that can happen through informed constructive exchange.   Our efforts are pro-democracy, and we are open to all.  We are inspired by all of you who join us week after week to inspired change!

We are on a mission, join us!
Soli Pierce and Susannah Johnston
#PostcardTuesdays

Croton Artisans 2017 – Call for Entries

July 6, 2017
by

Croton Artisans Holiday Boutique 2017

Call for Entries

Saturday, December 9th, 10am – 5pm

Sunday, December 10th, 11am – 4pm

 

Stanley M. Kellerhouse Municipal Building

1 Van Wyck Street, Croton on Hudson, NY 10520

Sponsored by Croton Council on the Arts

 

This is a juried show of items handmade by the participants.

Please note that for those artisans accepted into the show, participation is

mandatory for both days.

 

A $50 table fee will be due directly upon notification of acceptance.

(One 8-foot table will be provided.)

 

In addition, as provider of insurance for our event,

the Croton Council on the Arts requires

a $25 annual membership of all vendors.

 

Please complete the attached form

(pdf version — can be completed on your computer and then saved as a pdf, or

docx version — print, fill out, and scan to a pdf).

Email your form (as pdf attachment) and photos of your work,

by September 30th to:

crotonartisans@gmail.com

Updates from Postcard Tuesdays!

July 3, 2017
by
Postcard Tuesdays
1,000 postcards last week with your amazing help!

NO POSTCARD TUESDAYS THIS WEEK
Enjoy your holiday!
We will continue working for liberty and justice for all!

SUMMER HOURS 11am-4pm
July 11, 18 & 25
August-Labor Day we will break like Congress

We are growing every week, we are grateful to this community.
This is working because of you!
We have exceeded 17,000 cards to date.
We are the change. Keep coming back!

NEXT WEEK  – JULY 11
POSTCARD TUESDAYS
Black Cow Coffee Co. 
11am-4pm
The Green Growler
5-7pm

_____________________________

BIG THANKS
to Kathleen Corgan and Tom Smith for our latest postcards.
Please contact them if you need design work.
THANK YOU MARIO FOR RUNNING THE GREEN GROWLER,
Susan and Glenn will be joining us there for July!

IMPORTANT, AND SOMETHING WE CAN DO NOW

While we are breaking until July 11th we encourage you to
call the following Senators!  
Urge them to come up with a better Healthcare plan
NO for current plan.
We want Affordable Health Care for all.

LOG IN TO LINK AND HELP PRESERVE THESE MARINE SANCTUARIES.
The Us Park Service needs our help.
https://www.regulations.gov/docket?D=NOAA-NOS-2017-0066
Postcard Tuesdays is a vehicle for citizens to express their concerns to elected representatives and exercise their cherished First Amendment rights.  We want to build bridges instead of walls, and we trust that can happen through informed constructive exchange.   Our efforts are pro-democracy, and we are open to all.  We are inspired by all of you who join us week after week to inspired change!

We are on a mission, join us!
Soli Pierce and Susannah Johnston
#PostcardTuesdays

DEC Gives Homeowners Guidance to Avoid Problems with Bears and Conflicts with Coyotes

July 2, 2017

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC)  issued guidance on how to prevent negative encounters with black bears and conflicts with coyotes as warmer spring temperatures approach.

Bears

Nearly all negative bear encounters in New York are the result of hungry bears being attracted to human food sources. The simplest way to avoid a nuisance encounter is to remove potential food sources.

New York is home to more than 6,000 bears that emerge from the winter denning period and need to replenish nutrients and body fat. To do so, bears may travel long distances to preferred habitats that vary from season to season. Bears must sometimes cross roads or pass through developed areas to find these habitats, and often find human foods readily accessible if homeowners do not take necessary precautions.

Bears can obtain necessary food from the forest but are intelligent and opportunistic animals that find and consume easily accessible foods including, but not limited to, bird feeders, garbage cans, dumpsters, barbecue grills, unsecured out-buildings, or vehicles containing food or waste. Once a bear learns to obtain food from people or certain structures, it is difficult to change the animal’s behavior. These bears are more vulnerable to motor vehicle collisions in populated areas, more likely to be killed, or may become a threat to public safety.

In some cases, DEC is asked to relocate these bears. However, bear relocations are rarely effective and can be dangerous. Relocated bears often return to their original capture site, or may simply continue their bad habits at a new location. Additionally, if the circumstances that led to the original problem are not corrected, other bears may be attracted to the site and conflicts will persist.

It is dangerous and illegal to intentionally feed bears. The incidental, indirect feeding of black bears, such as with bird feeders or garbage is also unlawful.

To reduce the chance of negative black bear encounters, DEC recommends:

  • Never feed bears. It is illegal, dangerous and detrimental to bears.
  • If bears are being fed in your area, or you suspect a nuisance bear situation, report it to DEC immediately.
  • Take down bird feeders after April 1. Birds do not need supplemental food in the spring and summer when natural foods are most abundant.
  • Clean barbecue grills before nightfall and don’t forget the grease trap. If possible, store grills inside when not in use.
  • Store garbage in a secure building.
  • In areas near bear habitat, put garbage containers by the curb just before the scheduled pick-up-never the night before.
  • In densely populated bear areas, consider using a certified bear-resistant garbage container.
  • Clean garbage cans frequently with ammonia products.
  • Do not burn garbage. It is illegal and can attract bears.
  • Do not add meat scraps, bones, or melon rinds to compost piles.
  • Feed pets indoors and store pet food indoors. If pets must be fed outside, immediately remove all uneaten food and dishes.
  • It is important to appreciate and respect black bears as wild animals, from a distance.

    Coyotes

    Coyotes are an integral part of New York’s natural ecosystem, but can also come into conflict with people if they become habituated to humans and food sources. With the onset of warmer weather, many of New York’s coyotes will set up dens for pups that will arrive this spring. Coyotes are well adapted to suburban and even urban environments, but for the most part, will avoid contact with people.

    The Eastern coyote is found everywhere from rural farmlands and forests to populated suburban and urban areas. In most cases, coyotes avoid people and provide many exciting opportunities for New Yorkers through observation, photography, hunting, and trapping. However, if coyotes learn to associate people with food, such as garbage or pet food, they may lose their natural fear of humans and the potential for close encounters or conflicts increases.

    To minimize the chance of conflicts between people and coyotes, it is important to maintain coyotes’ natural fear of people. Below are recommended steps residents and visitors can take to reduce or prevent conflicts with coyotes:

  • Do not feed coyotes and discourage others from doing so.
  • Unintentional food sources attract coyotes and other wildlife and increase risks to people and pets. To reduce risks:
    • Do not feed pets outside;
    • Make garbage inaccessible to coyotes and other animals;
    • Fence or enclose compost piles so they are not accessible to coyotes; and
    • Eliminate availability of bird seed. Concentrations of birds and rodents that come to feeders can attract coyotes. If a coyote is seen near a birdfeeder, clean up waste seed and spillage to remove the attractant
  • Do not allow coyotes to approach people or pets.
  • Teach children to appreciate coyotes from a distance.
  • If you see a coyote, be aggressive in your behavior. Stand tall and hold arms out to look large. If a coyote lingers for too long, make loud noises, wave your arms, or throw sticks and stones.
  • Do not allow pets to run free. Supervise outdoor pets to keep them safe from coyotes and other wildlife, especially at sunset and at night. Small dogs and cats are especially vulnerable to coyotes.
  • Fencing your yard may deter coyotes. The fence should be tight to the ground, preferably extending six inches below ground level, and taller than four feet.
  • Remove brush and tall grass from around your home to reduce protective cover for coyotes. Coyotes are typically secretive and like areas where they can hide.
  • Contact the local police department and DEC regional office for assistance if you notice that coyotes are exhibiting “bold” behaviors and have little or no fear of people. Seeing a coyote occasionally throughout the year is not evidence of bold behavior.
  • Ask neighbors to follow these same steps.

    If coyote behavior becomes threatening, report it to the local DEC office, as this may indicate that some individual coyotes have lost their fear of people and there may be a greater risk that a problem could occur. For additional information about the Eastern Coyote and preventing conflicts with coyotes, visit the Eastern Coyote web page and Coyote Conflicts web page on DEC’s website.

    To learn more about New York’s black bears, visit DEC’s website or look for DEC’s DVD: ‘Living with New York Black Bears’, available at most local public libraries in New York.

    For more information about bears in your area or to report a problem with black bears, contact the nearest regional DEC office. For listings of Regional DEC Offices, visit DEC’s website.

 

Hydrilla Treatment in the Croton River to Begin on July 5, 2017

July 2, 2017

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) will begin its herbicide treatment of the hydrilla infestation in the Croton River on July 5th 2017. Treatment is likely to continue until mid-October 2017. The application of the aquatic herbicide fluridone (Sonar Genesis) is intended to control the growth and spread of the highly invasive aquatic plant hydrilla and reduce the plant’s long-term impacts on recreation, ecology, and water quality in the Croton River. NYSDEC has chosen a method of control that allows for use of a low concentration of herbicide (2-4 parts per billion) that is well below NYS Department of Health and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recommended limits. To put the treatment plan in perspective, the acceptable potable water limit per New York State Department of Health is 50 parts per billion. The concentration will be carefully monitored at the Village of Croton drinking water wells and in the river itself throughout the treatment period.  Please note that Silver Lake will remain open and there will be no restrictions on swimming as the treatment will not pose a risk to public health. Signage with information about the Hydrilla treatment will be placed along the Croton River in both English and Spanish.

 

This treatment program is the culmination of a long process, which included various meetings and public information sessions between the Village Board, Water Control Commission, Waterfront Advisory Committee, NYS Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) and NYC Department of Environmental Protection (NYCDEP). Hydrilla poses a grave threat to the health and viability of the Croton River and beyond, and the NYSDEC’s treatment will help to ensure that this aquatic invasive plant species does not populate further along the Croton River.

 

What is Hydrilla?

 

Hydrilla verticillata is a freshwater~plant with~stems that can grow up to 25 feet long. The plant branches out horizontally at the water’s surface and creates dense mats. Hydrilla has small, pointed, serrated leaves arranged around the stem, typically in whorls of five.~Hydrilla grows quickly and creates~dense mats that can block out sunlight and harm native plants, and its density can also kill fish by decreasing oxygen levels.~

 

Hydrilla is native to Australia,~Asia~and Africa and is believed to have made its way to the U.S. as an aquarium plant.

 

Hydrilla is often spread by boaters, as hydrilla fragments can cling to boats and trailers. Very small fragments of hydrilla can start new populations.

Happy Birthday America!

July 2, 2017
by
Ocean House is all spruced up and ready to celebrate our favorite season of the year with our brand new terrace and our ever growing wine & beer menu.
Be sure to check out this month’s Westchester Magazine. The Guide to Summer Fun includes a section on Hidden Patios and there we are! We are loving our additional space and our new call ahead reservation system is working out great! Be sure to call in after 4:30 on the day you wish to join us and we will happily save a table for you.
We will be posting information shortly about upcoming Summer Sunday events, and keep us in mind as your private party destination.
F.Y.I. Ocean House will be closed on Tuesday, July 4th.
We will re-open on Wednesday, July 5th at 5 pm.

     
Wishing you a safe and happy Fourth of July!
Hope to see you soon,
Paula & Brian Galvin
Check out our website www.oceanhouseoysterbar.com

 

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Ocean House · 49 N Riverside Ave · Croton-on-Hudson, NY
914-271-0702